Skip to Content

History Courses

 


For a more detailed look at each class, see

J. Nicols’ Ancient History courses webpage.

HIST 101 Western Civilization: (4)

This course is designed to introduce the students to the fundamental problems, values and sources of western history. In particular, the course will cover the period from the second millennium B.C. through about A.D. 1200 (that is, from the Bronze Age through the High Middle Ages.).
N. Andrade

HUM 354 The City: (4)

This course considers the role of culture, political freedom and urban development. It is designed as a “sophomore seminar” for Pathway students, but is open to all.
J. Nicols

PHYS 361 Culture and Scientific Discovery: (4)

This course traced the relationship between science and culture from the Greeks to the 20th Century. How do cultural assumptions affect the acceptance of new scientific ideas? How do scientific ideas affect cultural assumptions?
J. Nicols and G. Bothun.

HIST 407/507 Seminar Augustus and Hitler: (4)

Comparative dictatorships.
J. Nicols.

HIST 407/507 Seminar on Alexander: (4)

M. S. Nicols.

HIST 412/512 Classical Greece: (4)

Survey of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the fourth century BC. We will be examining major political, social and economic developments that marked this highly dynamic and innovative period. Such developments include the transition from Mycenaean kingdoms to city-states, the colonization of the Mediterranean, economic expansion and the advent of coinage, the age of the tyrants, the emergence of democracy, the Persian Wars, the Athenian empire, the Peloponnesian War and its aftermath until the rise of Macedonia as the dominant power in the Greek world. N. Andrade

HIST 412/512 The Age of Alexander: (4)

This course covers Greek history for the end of the Peloponnesian War, through the rise of Philip of Macedon, his conquest of the Greek cities and then to the career and conquests of Alexander the Great. Thereafter the course focuses especially on the political, intellectual and religious history of the ancient world through the Roman conquest and the spread of Christianity.
M. S. Nicols, N. Andrade

HIST 414/514 Ancient Rome, The Republic: (4)

History and culture of Ancient Rome from the foundation until the end of the Republic (the death of Caesar). Major themes include: the foundation of Rome (literature, archaeology and history), the constitution of the Roman Republic, imperialism, Roman religion and politics, the fall of the republican constitution, Julius Caesar and his competitor. M.S. Nicols.

HIST 414/514 Ancient Rome, The Principate and Empire: (4)

The history and culture of Rome and its Empire from the death of Caesar until the 5th century, AD. Major themes include: the Augustan Principate (art, literature, politics), Christianity and classical culture, the process of Romanization, the fall of the Roman Empire. Lecture and discussion. J. Nicols.

HIST 610: Digital History: (4)

This graduate level course offers students the opportunity to develop online courseware for teaching history.
J. Nicols.

Back to Top


Copyright © 2012 University of Oregon
Privacy Policy
Developed by CASpages